skillphiliac

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    6 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    There's totally an easier way for either of these, I pretty much described what to look out for and what might be needed to get it working reliably.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    You need timers, pretty much, or signal manipulators that blend over time or something.

    Here's the deal: combos work sequentially and you have to give humans some time to input the next keypress. There are different ways to do this, of course:

    Some games have logic that branches to check your input at runtime, i.e. the moment you press a button. So when you press square for a punch, you have to give the user some time to input the next square (for a left-right, let's say), otherwise you'd have a frame-perfect trick that nobody really could pull off all that well.

    Other games buffer your input. Basically, each input is arranged in a list, regardless of how far into your combo you currently are. Your animations (and damage, visual logic etc.) then runs sequentially, depending on different conditions. Here's how I'm thinking you could achieve this:

    Make timelines for each move in your combo. Arrange them according to what move they transition into, e.g. left-jab in timeline 1, right-jab in timeline 2. Arrange them horizontally. Between both timelines, you'll have to do something a bit more complicated to check whether you buffered the commands. Double-jab combo will be square square.

    When playing the jab, you'll have a check in place asking whether there is currently any other animation playing or a combo in progress. If not, you're good. You'd need to find a way to keep track of your inputs. I can't quite visualize how at the moment, but there's definitely a way. Maybe like this:

    Have variables for each button. If your max combo-length is 3, three should do. Assign the buffered button presses a number. When you press any significant button, and if no combo is running, you assign the combo button's value to the first variable.

    So, the first variable is stored. Somewhere you have logic that checks whether the variable is non-zero/a specific number corresponding to your combo moves. Since this is the first move, we want it to play instantly - we already checked if there is a combo going on, which it isn't.

    Now, one jab takes a couple of hundred milliseconds, and that is enough to allow humans to enter additional input. We'll be using the "is finished" output on the timeline and wire it up to check whether we continued the combo in time. First of all, when the timeline is finished and combo variable number 2, as mentioned earlier, has a value of 0 (meaning we never entered something during the window), we want to reset the combo - something I glossed over earlier in this part. Which, basically, means resetting the combo vars.

    If you want to check whether you're in a combo, you just have to check your combo variables. On ending each timeline, you check whether the next possible combo moves have a corresponding variable, if not - you just break out and reset whatever would prevent you from starting a fresh, new combo.

    There's lots to consider and it can get confusing, but if you know the basic structure, things can get easier, You also don't have to buffer inputs, although I think it'd be a nice project. And remember to share your stuff so we can look at it, debugging verbally is way slower, regardless of how happy I am to help. This was more like a conceptual tutorial.

    It's totally feasible, by the way. I've experienced a bug where the in-game animation differs from when I play it back in my timeline, so watch out for discrepancies; some bugs still need fixing.

  2. 2 votes
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    2 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    No, so far not. Try x-ray and check all your microchips, in the corners and everywhere. I once accidentally put it somewhere and tracks kept overlapping, so that's my guess.

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    3 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Yes, just take the school math. All you really have to remember is to shift the percentage by two decimals. That's literally what it is: number/100.

    So 40% = 0.4

    You take your value, multiply it by 0.4, bam, that's 40%. 100% of something is multiplying it by 1.

    If you want to make it a bit more readable to your taste, have a slider giving you a value in percent and then divide by a hundred before multiplying with your main value. Other than that, you should be set with this.

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    4 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    How do procedural creations impact this? Let's say I have a modular house and have a grid of tags laid out, each representing one house. I then emit these houses when I get close enough to a tag and broadcast the exact parameters with it (as I don't want randomization for this example).

    Will any subsequent emissions be as costly as the entirety of the modular asset in the emitter? Or will this incur additional costs and treat every building as unique, thus capping very soon?

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    8 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    I also upped the speed, higher speed are good for troubleshooting emitters, simply because you're likely to catch it opposed to stationary cubes being born in the same place.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Ok, fixed it. For record's sake here why it didn't work: you put the emitter on the object you want to emit. I'm not quite sure if this is intended behavior, but I'm thinking there is some recursiveness going on, making the cube want to emit itself with the emitter on itself etc. pp. Either way, I've gotten used to not stamping emitters on my particles.

    You can, however, drag them into microchips, at least after the fact. Selecting them allows you to then change the direction and so on. Remember also to "deactivate" the invisible mode so you can see the object.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    If you could show us your work, this might be much easier to troubleshoot. I'm not entirely sure of your configuration either, if you could just share it that would be great.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Try debugging in test mode. Does your emitter fire when you press the button? Does it light up? If so, did you add some ludicrous speed to the projectile and it's being fired off so fast you can't see it?

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    1 comment  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Totally. I forgot who did it, but there is a working piano and he did a drum set on top.

    If you want to play it yourself instead of triggering it via music cues, you could always just assign certain notes to buttons. So far, move controllers as game input are not supported (although I am fairly certain we will see that sometime in the future, because of VR and all that).

  7. 3 votes
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    2 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    4 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Without being able to see how you did things, I can only assume here: you'd want to think of a condition that has to be met for your mouth shapes to not show. Since you use separate timelines you might try and use the "is playing" output, negate it and hook it up to the power node in each shape. When the timeline is not playing, that means we're in base state and want to turn visibility off. Correct? I hope I'm not imagining there being an "is playing" output.

    If you want to then hide the default state, you'd have to use an OR-gate and put all the "is playing"s of your other phoneme-timelines into the power node: regardless of what shape is currently playing, we don't want the default state to show.

    If you show us more, I'd be able to offer more specific help. This should help at least a bit though.

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    4 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    That's what I was thinking too - just have dedicated "control" objects and apply a force to each individual nodes. The physics engine should do the rest, I believe.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Could you please publish what you've done so far, I'd be taking a look.

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    6 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Duh, completely missed that option. And remember to pay attention to how long and how often you apply that damage. But yeah, you can do this too, of course. And as far as my option is concerned: the signal remapper requires an input signal to work in the first place, so no wonder why that wasn't working by default. Rough morning for me.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Here you go: https://indreams.me/element/bwneGicd8vc

    This is more of a demonstration, how you want to do this is up to you, really. Here's what I did:

    - added the signal manipulator and in remapping mode chose PULSE ON. This means you won't accidentally trigger the attack twice, which is sort of a game-breaking bug

    - hooked up the square button to the signal manipulator. I expected the manip to also trigger when the timeline is playing, but that was not the case. Hence why I connected the wire into it directly. This means that each time the timeline's playing we'll get a single pulse...

    - ... which I then wired into your health modifiers. They will only work and thus only do damage when the signal in your attack-timeline pulses.

    Like the attack, it's pretty snappy and I like it so much more than limp ones taking minutes to finish. Hope that helped.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Publish what you made and I'll take a dive in/provide some explanation.

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    5 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    What phort said. Look at all the remixable examples of people using keyframes to animate their characters, it's fairly simple to do if you just want a specific jumping animation.

    Drag out the deluxe puppet and scope into the logic. Try to understand how it works, you'll notice three keyframes responsible for the jumping/hang-time animation in the air. You should be able to just modify that for your long-jump. Attach a mover or even a force applier to your puppet, connect it to the input you'd like to use --> bam, you've got a long jump.

    And if this seems all too intimidating because you barely started out with Dreams: publish it. Publish your efforts and have someone look at it. People are really open to do anything right now, so you'll be bound to get some kind of help. Long jumps definitely not going to be a problem!

  12. 3 votes
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    8 comments  ·  indreams.me 🦕 » Bugs 🐛  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Forums seem to be completely shot at the moment - the post counts haven't changed for a day and comment counts are imprecise, to say the least.

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    5 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Tell us what you did in the level/puppet or release it for us to take a look at.

    Sounds like you put a mover on it or changed the controls to fire automatically, something along those lines. That or you have overlapping geometry, which in Dreams' physics engine would mean that the bodies repel each other, quite violently in fact.

    But do make use of the easy-to-share nature of Dreams, it's just as easy to link from indreams.me to make it even more comfortable for players to test your stuff.

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    1 comment  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    If-statements are somewhat contextual in Dreams. Some things don't require you to tediously draw them up (which I'm going to explain in a second) and you can just expect certain gadgets to work as is, with the ternary stuff running behind the scenes. Say trigger zones, you already know how these work I bet, and they technically have one or two "ifs" in there.

    So if you get a positive signal from, say once more a trigger zone, and wire it into the power node of an emitter, that's basically an if-statement. Now, comparing a value against another is pretty easy, you just need a calculator gadget. Enter its settings (L1 + square, if you didn't know that, do the tutorials!) )and change it to whatever you like, there are all kinds of arithmetic tools you might need and many more pre-fabs created by the community (sine, rotators, conversions... you name it).if you browse for logic.

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    6 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Adding to this: dragging the filter left will give you the muffled tone. Right is bright (neat, there are mnemonics hidden in here).

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Yup, try everything about the filter, maybe a bit of reverb. You'll definitely have to tweak it, but if you want the dull thudding of an object against a helmet or something like that... that's what I'd go with for starters.

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    3 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    So that's not all that easy, but here's how you could get started:

    - Use wireless transmitters (WT) to broadcast your attack. You'll have to tune your attack animation so you'll send the WT signal at the correct time and for the length you see fit, but other than that, you just have to put in a descriptive label and put a wireless receiver on the blocking enemy.

    - Set the label on the receiver to match your attack label. Whenever you attack, the enemy's wireless receiver should now pulse during the damaging part of it.

    - Now is where you check whether you block. Since we only really want a signal (for this part of the damage logic, at least) when you both broadcast the attack (because of your attack) and have a blocking enemy at the same time, you'll need an AND gate for both wires.

    - You can, of course, wire it all traditionally. The major difference between WT/WR and hardwiring it is that you don't have to bother with scoping at the right level and having to trace wires - as long as you keep track of what broadcasts which signal to whom. Say you make an emitter-based system that keeps spawning baddies for you to kill: if you forget to use enemy-specific trigger zones for your default damaging attack, you might accidentally run your damage logic in all the enemies reacting to your puppet's wireless transmitter - despite you only attacking one of them. So keep an eye out for that.

    To summarize this fairly complex topic:

    - during your attack animation, fire a signal. Take this signal and put it in an AND-gate with the blocking logic. Whenever both criteria are satisfied, you'll run the low/no-damage logic. Copy the logic, take the same input and put a NOT-gate between the blocking logic and damage logic #2. This is your normal hit and will branch into full-damage logic.

    If you're having troubles with any of this, like how to generate a signal during the animation, I'll be happy to look at your project. Just post it here and I'll get the basic setup running for you. Depending on your game, there are tons of different and possibly more suitable approaches.

  17. 2 votes
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    11 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Right, the whole thing is looking real nice, forgot to say. Simple idea with a great result, reactive "particle" effects add so much cohesion to games and really to the gameplay as well. I played around for a bit and uploaded a remix of it (called "two emitters"), it's a simple way of making it look even more believable. If you put like 5 emitters all offset by 2 or 3 degrees, make the smoke smaller and fix the wires (copying the logic will put the world space location into the power node of the cloned emitter), you'll have a nice geometry-enveloping dust/smoke cloud, which looks especially cool in corners and on crests where you'd expect the clouds to come together or split apart.

    Can't wait to see what you're doing for the trees, because they have to shake at some point!

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    >Managed it by wiring the ‘hit something’ output of the scope to the power of the emitter. Seems good now.

    Oh, perfect. Exactly what I meant since you already power the scope selectively, which is precisely how I thought about it. Your chips were arranged quite neatly already, so troubleshooting that wasn't a big deal at all, do that all the time and you're golden. :D

    And only powering sensors when you need them probably isn't bad practice either, just to make sure you don't run expensive or superfluous stuff all the time, so... looking good for sure!

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    You need to take a wire from the node going into Thrust and put it into the gate - incoming signal. The other input for the and gate is "hit something" from the laser scope.

    Your current situation is this: your emitter can't resolve the location of your scope, which either means that the scope is off (I think you wired this up too) or it doesn't get a location. If it doesn't get a location, we don't want the emitter to fire at all (because your ship is in the air), so make sure that no other wires are coming from the laser scope other than "hit something".

    Since you activate the laser scope only when you use Thrust, wiring "hit something" to the emitter might be enough, no idea why I needed an AND-gate for that. That's basically a gate already.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    I could upload it, but it's a pretty simple tweak, just holler if you need anything else.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    I gotcha with this one. Remember debugging visually - if stuff lights up right from the beginning (which your thrust module does), you're checking for conditions you don't even care about. You only want the smoke to appear when you thrust, which you could easily do by just hooking the incoming signal (coming in the thrust microchip) into the emitter's off switch. Otherwise, you'd always get some result and (apparently) the emitter defaults to this location, probably because that's where it was first (I'm really just guessing here). Fact is, you're always trying to emit the smoke, but only in the correct position when you get a hit result.

    Still not quite there yet because of that. Now we can see that your rocket smoke is exclusive as long as you get a result. Otherwise, we can see that one tree try to lift off again with a huge cloud below it.

    So instead of what we did, I'd just use the scope's "hit something" node. Your emitter used to fire every single time you got thrust in, even if there is no surface for the smoke to bounce off. Just get an AND-gate and get "hit something" and the main signal you already wired into the emitter. Hook the gate into your emitter once more and it'll work out just as you wanted.

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    1 comment  ·  indreams.me 🦕 » Feedback  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    10 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Screenshots? Project name? What do you mean by abinarion?

    Blending into frames should be easy - dynamically changing your puppet is not. You need to access different states and consider how much of a keyframe you want to be part of the current animation, which can get pretty complex. There is all kinds of stuff that could have gone wrong with yours, so just show us and we'll help you.

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    5 comments  ·  Dreams "How Do I?" 🤔  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Ok, maybe not quite: I uploaded "Grab Sensor Example" for you to check out. You have to invert the output of the counter, otherwise you'd automatically disable the grab sensor by default and won't ever trigger it. I also changed the saturation to zero so you can discern between what has been grabbed and what hasn't. For the glow, a remapper with pulse on works best because I didn't want the glow to be too bright (again, tons of ways to do this).

    Cheers!

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    I'm pretty sure you're overthinking this. Just use the default counter, no changes to max count or anything. You immediately want to switch the grab sensor off and connect a timer to reset the counter (or whatever signal ultimately drives your glow), other than that, you're fine.

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    skillphiliac commented  · 

    Do you want it to turn off, the glow that is? Like a second-long glow? Remember to wire the output of your counter (which, by default, should make it glow permanently) to the grab sensors on/off switch so it won't work anymore.

    If you want smooth transitions: I'd personally go for a signal manipulator and change the transition time. As long as the counter is full, the sensor won't work and you'll get a custom glow animation.

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